Follow Us:

social twitter box white 32 social facebook box blue 32social linkedin box blue 32ISN Blog

ISN blog

ISN President Adeera Levin and Executive Council Member Masaomi Nangaku recently traveled to Thailand to meet with local nephrologists and government officers from the country’s Ministry of Public Health. The main highlight of the visit was going to Chitralada Palace for an audience with H.R.H Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn, presenting the Her Royal Highness with an ISN Special Recognition Award for her extraordinary contributions to caring for CKD patients. 

Georgi Abraham, a long-standing member of ISN who is currently part of the ISN South Asia Regional Board has received an award from Sri Lanka’s President Maithripala Sirisena at a ceremony at the Galle Face Hotel in Colombo.

The Charak Memorial Hospital in Nepal is building further ties with the Royal London Hospital thanks to ISN Fellow Klara Paudel. The UK team will give clinical advice and provide training to set up a peritoneal dialysis (PD) program, among many more activities.

As a young pathologist working at Madras Medical Mission Hospital in Chennai and  through her ties with ISN ANIO Programs, Priyanka Koshy got the opportunity to gain further training at the University of Vanderbilt.

Nephrologists from the ISN Sister Renal Center partnership between the Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education in Minsk, Belarus and the Charite Clinic in Berlin, Germany brought their experience and knowledge of modern nephrology to this yearly gathering.

OhsumiAutophagy has been shown to be an essential mechanism by which cells remove defective molecular and cell organelle components, thereby renewing themselves constantly and especially after cell injury.

As part of the East African Diploma of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (EADTMH), we are currently part of a group investigating the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the Muheza District of northeastern Tanzania, and looking into the health system’s preparedness for their management.

Monday, 12 September 2016 09:44

ISN heads to Copenhagen for WHO Regional Committee Featured

By

whoISN will attend the 66th session of World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Committee for Europe, taking place in Copenhagen as of September 12, 2016.

Avatar 2016 Tushar blogAVATAR 2016 is an event that exemplifies the renal vascular access armamentarium. It was held in New Delhi from July 23 to 24, 2016 and was the 5th annual event for the Association of Vascular Access & inTerventionAl Renal Physicians (AVATAR)

Recent ISN efforts to better position kidney disease on the global health agenda paid off recently as kidney disease was mentioned in the resolution stemming from the recent United Nations High Level Meeting on non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Tuesday, 09 August 2016 17:09

SAMA Renal Review & Update Course, 2016 Featured

By

The SAMA Renal Review and Update course took place recently. Every year, this ISN endorsed meeting sets out to enhance renal education and training in Sudan.

Wednesday, 03 August 2016 10:18

The snake bite effect on Myanmar’s renal patients Featured

By

As a recent guest of Professor Khin Maung Htay at Yangon’s Thingangyun San Pya Hospital and Yangon Specialist Hospital, I was exposed to how snake bites are a major health concern in Myanmar, especially for kidney patients.

ISN was extremely pleased to have funded the first training for principal investigators and project managers from clusters in Bolivia, Malawi, Nepal and Tanzania, taking part in the 0by25 Pilot Feasibility Project. This took place at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) facilities from July 16 to 19, 2016.

Monday, 27 June 2016 17:26

Educational site visit to Cambodia Featured

By

Bernadette Thomas travelled to Phnom Penh, Cambodia for an educational site visit and evaluated the possibility of carrying out an acute kidney injury incidence study. This blog post details the outcome of her trip.

Medical Students who are at the end of their medical training assembled for two teaching sessions over two consecutive days. Day one involved a two-hour lecture on the utility of urine microscopy for evaluating and constructing a differential for acute and chronic kidney disease.

This blog post is provided by Paula Orlandi, Naohiko Fujii, Lisa Nessel, Harold I. Feldman.

The International Network for Chronic Kidney Disease Cohort Studies (iNET-CKD) links chronic kidney disease (CKD) cohorts from all over the world to promote research on this rapidly growing public health issue. It is supported by the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) and currently comprises of 14 cohort studies, representing patients from more than 20 developed and developing countries. New cohort study members continue to join the network.

This blog post is provided by Elwaleed Elhassan from Wayne State University School of Medicine and Secretary General of the Sundanese American Medical Association (SAMA).

Sudan is the third largest country in Africa, with a population of about 30 million. There is no national renal registry but end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is estimated to affect 5,400 new cases per year.

In collaboration with ISN’s Dialysis Committee, ISN Education is launching a new series of webinars focused on prominent themes in dialysis in 2016 and 2017.

Tuesday, 24 May 2016 09:57

New KI editor in 2017 Featured

By

Detlef Schlondorff announced recently that he will be stepping down as Editor of Kidney International from the end of 2017. Under his leadership ISN’s flagship journal has continued to grow in impact and in appeal to its global readership.

Thursday, 19 May 2016 09:53

CKDu in Sri Lanka Featured

By

Adeera Levin, Marcello Tonelli and David Harris represented ISN at a three-day workshop sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO), which took place in April in Colombo and focused on the epidemic of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu). This is afflicting a large number of agricultural workers in Sri Lanka, particularly in the North and Central provinces.

Blantyre renal hospital 1A study undertaken during 2015 at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi demonstrated that 20% of general medical admissions over a three-month period had evidence of kidney disease. Outcome (hospital mortality) in these patients was significantly worse than those with normal renal function.

dialysisA dialysis patient referred me to this article from The Atlantic. Published in 2010 but still worth reading. The ISN is all about closing gaps in the provision of kidney care worldwide, but when we think of "gaps", we tend to think of emerging countries, places in Africa or the poorest parts of Asia and Latin America. However, as the article recounts, there are significant gaps in the provision of dialysis even in the United States. Please do read this excellent story, which includes words from ISN past president, dr. Giuseppe Remuzzi, among others.

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2010/12/-god-help-you-youre-on-dialysis/308308/

Having returned from spending a month working with the renal team Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi, I wanted to blog about what nephrologists and nephrology researchers are up against in the country. I had the pleasure of working with a dedicated team of people on a current research study focusing on children suffering from acute kidney injury in Malawi.

KI reportsKidney International Reports, an official journal of the International Society of Nephrology, is a peer-reviewed, open access journal devoted to the publication of leading research and developments related to kidney disease.

Access to diagnosis and dialysis for acute kidney injury can be life-saving, but can be prohibitively expensive in low-income settings. The burden of acute kidney injury in sub-Saharan Africa is presumably high but remains unknown. The authors of this study did a systematic review to assess outcomes of acute kidney injury in sub-Saharan Africa and identify barriers to care.

Tuesday, 29 March 2016 12:33

The influence of diet on kidney stones Featured

By

Having discussed the influence of lifestyle modification on prevention of chronic kidney disease in previous columns extensively, I will now turn my attention to its effect on prevention of kidney stones. Almost five percent of adults in the US suffer from kidney stones, with more than half having multiple recurrences. Patients end up in the emergency room experiencing agonizing pain and many undergo multiple procedures to remove them by lithotripsy or surgery.

This ISN Blog post is provided by Rezvi Sheriff at the Western Hospital, Sri Lanka following this year’s World Kidney Day celebrations.

Western Hospital in Borella, Sri Lanka conducted a special program to mark the 11th World Kidney Day on March 10, 2016.

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is the fastest growing chronic non-communicable disease caused by modifiable lifestyle risk factors as discussed previously, CLICK HERE. It is important to highlight the effect of dietary habits on the onset and progression of CKD.

Rates of Chronic Kidney Disease vary considerably across Europe, from 3% to 17% of the population, and are increasing. Demand for kidneys almost always exceeds possible supply, and each country manages transplants differently. A new survey, being presented at the European Association of Urology (EAU) congress in Munich, has shown significant differences in the number of donor kidneys available in each country.

Comparing data from a range of registers, the EAU research found wide country to country variation. For example:

Russian Federation 3.3
Greece 4.2
Germany 10.4
Switzerland 14.3
Poland 15.5
The Netherlands 16.8
UK 20.6
Italy 22.7
France 25.3
Portugal 27.3
Croatia 35.1
Spain 35.7

All figures are 2014 figures. All figures are deceased donors per million population.

Although each country is very different, thse variations mainly depend on two factors, social attitude and perception of organ donation, and legislation. Most organs for transplantation come from brain-dead donors. In Spain for example, each citizen is a potential donor unless they 'opt-out' of the transplant scheme, whereas in Germany there is an 'opt-in' scheme. Some countries also allow donation from living donors, or from persons whose hearts have stopped. The number of organs from both these sources has been increasing.

As transplants becomes more mainstream, and rates of kidney failure are increasing, the demand for organs has increased quite significantly, and there is a general need for more organs to be available. At the moment, whether you can find a donor organ largely depends on where you live. If countries want to increase transplant rates, and so increase survival from kidney failure, they might consider changing the way they source donor organs.

Vellore, Tamil Nadu in southern India in January. Warm and pleasant, rather like a good English summer but the locals say it is a bit too chilly! I am glad January was chosen for my ISN Educational Ambassador visit to the Christian Medical College (CMC) – before the monsoon season and the seriously hot weather in the middle of the year.

According to the data released by The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) last week, the prevalence of obesity in the United States is at an all time high. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a metric used by organizations worldwide to define and classify severity of obesity.

The Royal Liverpool University has been working together with the Al Shifa hospital in Gaza since 2013. Read 'The Guardian' report of Salim, a member of the Liverpool team during their last visit to Gaza in February:

On February 25, ISN staff at the Brussels headquarters had the pleasure of meeting former ISN President prof. Robert Atkins (2001-2003), and his wife, prof. Prudence Hill, also involved in kidney medicine being a pathologist at University of Melbourne. 

It was a great opportunity to remember the time when ISN, thanks to prof. Atkins’ foresight, started to structure itself with the help of professional staff, and to compare past and present challenges and opportunities for the ISN. We certainly made some progress during the last two decades, but this is firmly anchored in past leadership’s wisdom and careful planning and commitment to advancing kidney care worldwide through a unique scientific and humanitarian Society.

We are grateful to prof. Atkins for having taken the time in his European trip to come and visit our Brussels office. 

 

ISN HQ Feb 2016 1

Prof. Robert Atkins and his wife, prof. Prudence Hill, from Melbourne, honor the Nephrology ship which was at the first World Congress of Nephrology in Evian, 1960

Earlier this January, several ISN Continuing Medical Education courses took place across China in Shanghai, Jiaxing and Hangzhou. These meetings were made possible thanks to a valuable partnership between the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Ruijin Hospital Jiao Tong University, Chang Zheng Hospital, the Second Military Medical University and the First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University.

This blog post is provided by Anil Chandraker, Medical Director of Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation Brigham and Women’s Hospital and ISN Educational Ambassador Vanessa Bijol.

In the past two years The Renal Division and the Nephropathology Service at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts has trained two ISN Fellows from Thailand in transplant nephrology and two from Nigeria and China in renal pathology.

The Kuwait Nephrology Association organized a two-day symposium and workshop on vascular access in Kuwait. The workshop was planned as an initiative by ISN’s Middle East Regional Board and the Interventional Nephrology Committee to improve dialysis access care in the Middle East.

This blog post is provided thanks to reports from Hui Kim Yap from the National University of Singapore and Yi Yi Khin from the Yangon Children's Hospital and Mandalay Children's Hospital. They both took part in ISN’s Educational Ambassador Program.

In January, ISN Educational Ambassador Hui Kim Yap visited Yangon Children Hospital, Myanmar to share expertise and knowledge. The course focused on dialysis, clinical nephrology, acute kidney injury, transplantation, with some specific educational training on lupus nephritis, nephrotic syndrome in children and managing chronic kidney disease.

I would like to introduce everyone to a free online patient education resource that has now been translated into 20 languages and has over 20 million hits - http://kidneyeducation.com/

A revised and updated English version, edited by Edgar Lerma, has now been digitized and is ready to be released.

This blog post is provided by the Saving Young Lives Initiative following the team's recent visit to Senegal.

 In December 2015, the Senegalese Society of Nephrology held its first course on dialysis in West Africa. More than 300 delegates attended this highly successful conference.

Tuesday, 12 January 2016 14:59

CKDu in Sri Lanka's population Featured

By

On December 16, 2015, Georgi Abraham and I had the honor of being invited to discussions with Sri Lanka’s President Maithripala Sirisena, the country’s Minister of Health as well as the leadership of the Sri Lankan Society of Nephrology.

This blog post is provided by Kirill Komissarov at the Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education in Minsk, Belarus.

Fellows from the Charite Clinic University Clinic in Berlin, Germany spent a month with two fellows from the Minsk center thanks to an ISN Sister Renal Center partnership. Local medical professionals Aliaksandra Hashchuk is an intensivist and Volha Dybava is a nephrologist.

ISHD opening ceremonyThe 9th International Congress of the International Society for Hemodialysis (ISHD) was held from September 13 to 16, 2015 at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre, Malaysia.

Wednesday, 04 November 2015 10:26

Kidney International Reports announcement Featured

By

It is with great pleasure that I announce the launch of ISN’s new Journal: Kidney International Reports (KI Reports). KI Reports is designed to be a sister journal of Kidney International published in open access format.

20150815140944 A26U1036The global growth of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients has resulted in an increasing number surviving on renal replacement therapy. Hemodialysis remains a predominant form of renal replacement therapy. Providing optimal dialysis vascular access care remains a challenging task.

Thursday, 17 September 2015 16:38

CKD: has implications well beyond the risk of dialysis Featured

By

Kidney disease does affect 1:10 adults. It is defined as: “abnormalities of kidney structure and/or function present for greater than three months, with implications for health.”

onconephrology webCancer is one of the leading causes of death and is rapidly becoming a global pandemic. Cancer patients with kidney disease have a worse prognosis with higher mortality and morbidity.

Monday, 20 July 2015 09:51

Meet our new ISN councillor from Turkey Featured

By

Last March during the World Congress of Nephrology in South Africa, you voted for the new members of the ISN Council, ISN’s governing body.

Monday, 18 May 2015 09:49

ISN–ASDIN Educational Partnership Featured

By

ASDINISN and the American Society of Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology (ASDIN) have entered into an educational partnership agreement to promote and improve the understanding and management of clinical issues concerning dialysis access care.

science blog 2A couple of weeks ago, when a mail inviting me to contribute to the ISN blog landed in my inbox, I instinctively hit the delete button. After all, is my life not already too busy? There are grant applications and manuscripts to write and review, PhD theses to pore over, classes to take, presentations and question papers to prepare, patients to see, manage an office, lab meetings to supervise, research consortia to manage, and meetings to go to. And after all, how useful is a blog compared to these very important activities?

 

Even though the mail was out of my sight but not completely out of my mind. My conscience was jolted further when my son, a master’s student, sent me a link to this story.

kidneyISN leaders Giuseppe Remuzzi, Guillermo Garcia Garcia and Motoko Yanagita have got involved in translating valuable educational material into Italian, Spanish and Japanese. This resource was released on World Kidney Day 2015 to show support for the overall theme for this year’s campaign: Kidney Health for All.

Adib pioneerMembers of our unit at Westmead Hospital, Sydney (Australia) have just returned from a four day-day visit to the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT) in Karachi (India).

Page 1 of 3

WCN 2017

wcn ad new

Donate to WKF

wkf donate

Global Operations Center

Rue des Fabriques 1
1000 Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 2 808 04 20
Fax: +32 2 808 4454
Email contact

               

Americas Operations Center

340 North Avenue 3rd Floor
Cranford, NJ 07016-2496, United States
Tel: +1 567 248 9703
Fax: +1 908 272 7101
Email contact