KDIGO Diabetes in CKD Guideline Webinar: Looking at the Latest Evidence and Beyond

ISN is pleased to invite you to the KDIGO Diabetes in CKD Guideline Webinar: Looking at the Latest Evidence and Beyond, to be held on Monday, June 22, 2020 at 06:00 PM CEST.

Join the webinar to learn more about the new KDIGO Guideline on Diabetes Management in CKD, focusing on topics such as glycemic monitoring and targets, lifestyle and anti-hyperglycemic interventions, and approaches to self-management and optimal models of care.

  Date: June 22, 2020
  Time: 6:00 PM CEST
Register Now

To learn more, watch the video introduction to the new KDIGO Diabetes Guideline below.

Speakers

Chairperson

Ian de Boer

Ian de Boer, MD, MS
(Work Group Co-Chair)

Ian H. de Boer is Professor of Medicine and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA, USA. Dr. de Boer received his medical degree from Oregon Health Sciences University. He trained in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and in nephrology at the University of Washington, where he also earned a master’s degree in epidemiology. Dr. de Boer practices nephrology at the Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Healthcare System and is an associate director of the Kidney Research Institute at the University of Washington.

Dr. de Boer’s research focuses on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) and its complications. His epidemiology work has helped define the clinical course of kidney disease in types 1 and 2 diabetes, including prevalence, incidence, risk factors, outcomes, relationships with cardiovascular disease, and the impact of diabetes treatments; his additional work also employs patient-oriented physiology research and clinical trials. Dr. de Boer has published more than 300 manuscripts in the field and was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation for these research contributions. He served on the American Diabetes Association Professional Practice Committee from 2016-2019, chairing the complications subgroup which oversaw development of the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, and is currently deputy editor of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Living with Diabetes and CKD

Tami Sadusky

Tami Sadusky, MBA
(Work Group Member)

Tami Sadusky received a pancreas and kidney transplant in 1993 and a second kidney transplant in 2011. She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 13 and, within 20 years, had developed complications from the disease, including kidney failure. The transplants brought her a new life.

Tami received her BS and MBA degrees prior to moving to Washington, where she worked at the University of Washington (UW) for 22 years as executive director of Research Finance and Operations. She is now an active volunteer in the areas of organ donation and transplantation and has been invited to speak about her patient experience both pre- and post-transplant. She is on the board of directors for Transplant House, a non-profit organization that provides housing for transplant patients. She is an active member of the UW Transplant Advisory Council, the UW Kidney Education and Support Group, the UW Team Transplant Strategic Planning and Finance Committee, the Kidney Research Institute Advisory Council, and works closely with the Northwest Kidney Centers. Three years ago, Tami established a UW gift fund, the Sadusky Diabetes Kidney Research Fund, which supports diabetes and kidney research.

Tami has been involved with KDIGO for the past two years developing the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease.

Management of Diabetes in CKD

Peter Rossing

Peter Rossing, MD, DMSc
(Work Group Co-Chair)

Peter Rossing is a clinician researcher devoted to complications in diabetes with a focus on renal and cardiovascular complications. He obtained a specialist degree in internal medicine and endocrinology in 2004. Since 2007, he has been a chief physician and manager of the Steno Diabetes Center research team dedicated to the research of micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes.

As a professor in diabetic angiopathy at the University of Copenhagen since 2012, Dr. Rossing has conducted epidemiological studies investigating key features of the pathophysiology of the diabetic kidney at different stages. He has identified several markers for the development of diabetic nephropathy, making it possible to predict individual risk. Dr. Rossing has been involved in several intervention studies in patients with overt diabetic nephropathy aiming at improving the prognosis.

He is the coordinator of the EU FP7 project, PRIORITY, demonstrating that urinary proteomics can be used to stratify the prevention of renal complications in type 2 diabetes, and the Novo

Nordisk Foundation grant, PROTON, aiming at personalizing prevention of diabetic nephropathy.

He has co-authored over 420 papers, and his h-index is 69. He received the Minkowski prize in 2005, the Golgi prize in 2016 (both from the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]), and the E. Bierman award from the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Dr. Rossing has also served as president of the Danish Endocrine Society and the European Diabetic Nephropathy Study group, and as chairman of the Danish National Diabetes Registry.

Management of CKD in Diabetes

Katherine R. Tuttle

Katherine R. Tuttle, MD, FASN, FACP, FNKF
(Work Group Member)
 

Katherine R. Tuttle is the executive director for research at Providence Health Care, co-principal investigator of the Institute of Translational Health Sciences, and professor of medicine at the University of Washington, USA. Dr. Tuttle earned her medical degree and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Northwestern University School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. She was a fellow in Metabolism and Endocrinology at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Her Nephrology fellowship training was performed at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas.

Dr. Tuttle’s major research interests are in clinical and translational science for diabetes and CKD. She has published over 200 original research contributions and served two terms as Associate Editor for the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology and the American Journal of Kidney Disease. Dr. Tuttle has received many honors and awards, including the Medal of Excellence from the American Association of Kidney Patients, Garabed Eknoyan Award from the NKF, the YWCA Woman of Achievement Award in Science, and two Outstanding Clinical Faculty Awards at the University of Washington. Dr. Tuttle served on the Board of Directors for the Kidney Health Initiative and has chaired numerous kidney and diabetes-related working groups and committees for organizations including the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)/NIH, the NKF, the American Society of Nephrology, the ISN, and the ADA.

Join the KDIGO Webinar

Register Now

Honoring the Past, Welcoming the Future:

Honoring the Past, Welcoming the Future:
Experience the ISN Timeline

As part of the ISN’s 60th year celebrations, I am pleased to share with you a short video highlighting some of the Society’s recent achievements. These have been made possible by the passion and commitment of ISN members, steady supporters, and visionary leaders.

A unique role in global nephrology:
The International Society of Nephrology 2011-2020 

ISN Past-President John Feehally traces the evolution of the ISN's vision for meeting the challenges of the 21st century in his narration of history of the Society in “A unique role in global nephrology: The International Society of Nephrology 2011-2020”, published in the Kidney International.

The ISN continues to fulfil its role in addressing the most pressing global challenges in delivery of kidney care through its capacity building programs, continued education of all kidney health professionals, supporting research, advocating for optimal kidney health through initiatives such as 0by25, and partnering with other organizations including the WHO.

Geographical Updates

Geographical Updates on Management of COVID-19 Patients with Kidney Disease

Report authors Dr Anna Francis, Dr Sethu Madhavan, Professor T Alp Ikizler, Associate Professor Germaine Wong, Professor Pierre Ronco, Professor Vivek Jha

Introduction
Since the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in Wuhan in December 2019, there has been rapid global spread culminating in the World Health Organisation declaring a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. As of April 16, 2020, over 2 million confirmed cases have occurred in 210 countries and territories, with 137,000 deaths. After the initial epicentre of Wuhan, Italy, Spain, France, the United Kingdom and the United States have been heavily affected with grave concerns held for the impending impact of COVID-19 in developing countries.

The nephrology community recognises their (mostly older) end stage kidney disease patient population are particularly vulnerable, as older people with chronic disease face increased risks of mortality and the necessity of regular hospital visits increases the risk of contracting the virus. In regions where vast numbers of cases have been recorded, health systems are strained to, and beyond, capacity.

The International Society of Nephrology and Kidney International, the ISN Journal, undertook a survey of nephrologists around the globe as represented by the ten ISN Regions, inquiring about the impact of COVID-19 on dialysis patients and staff and health system responses to the pandemic specific to dialysis.

COVID-19 poses an unprecedented threat to the modern world. Every region of the globe is affected, and dialysis services are particularly hit, with an unwell older population at increased risk of infection and mortality. Most haemodialysis patients are dialysed in centre and hence these patients are unable to self isolate, substantially increasing their risk of infection. Peritoneal dialysis patients may be less affected as they are better placed to practice social isolation.

The nephrology workforce is stretched, with an increased workload in both outpatient dialysis and inpatient consults for acute kidney injury secondary to COVID-19 infection. Healthcare workers are also falling ill or needing to be quarantined, further depleting the workforce at this time of increased need. Despite the significant psychological burden, centres around the world celebrate the resilience of their staff and their determination to care for their patients as best as possible.

Globally, mitigation strategies in dialysis units include:

  • Temperature checking and health screening of staff and patients prior to entering units
  • Cohorting (spatially and temporally) patients with suspected and proven COVID-19
  • Maintaining social distancing within units, where possible
  • PPE for staff when dealing with COVID-19+ or suspected patients
  • Differing rules about the wearing of face masks for asymptomatic in-centre dialysis patients
  • Educating patients on signs of COVID-19, social isolation and handwashing
  • The use of telehealth in place of physical reviews

Major challenges reported include:

  • Vastly increased workload with decreased staffing capacity
  • Lack of test kits
  • Lack of widespread testing, especially in outpatient facilities
  • Initial false negatives with earlier test kits
  • Lack of PPE
  • Difficulties in transporting patients to and from dialysis when there is a lockdown
  • Increased demand on dialysis services mean some centres have decreased number of sessions or number of hours per session for chronic haemodialysis patients

The rapidly evolving crisis of COVID-19 continues to imperil our vulnerable dialysis population. The ISN thanks all contributors for providing insights on current regional situations and responses the pandemic.

Please click on the pin in the map to access the reports per continent.

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test home

Nephrology Societies call for ensuring optimal care to patients with kidney diseases during the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to acquire dimensions of a humanitarian crisis as it spreads in the countries outside of Europe and the USA in the coming weeks and months.

The pandemic is exposing the basic structural deficiencies of health care in general, and kidney care in particular. Lockdowns and loss of livelihoods have severely restricted the ability of adults and children with kidney disease to access regular care and medications in some parts of the world. Patients with end-stage kidney disease have been particularly affected: lack of availability of transport is impeding the ability to access regular dialysis. Vital supplies, including personal protective equipment (PPE) for staff and patients and dialysis consumables, have become threatened due to interruptions in the free movement and challenges in acquisition. In some instances, restrictions imposed by governments have also contributed to the steshortages.

Read More


Global Report

Global Reports

Report compiled by Dr Anna Francis, Dr Sethu Madhavan, Professor T Alp Ikizler, Associate Professor Germaine Wong, Professor Pierre Ronco, Professor Vivek Jha

Introduction
Since the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in Wuhan in December 2019, there has been rapid global spread culminating in the World Health Organisation declaring a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. As of April 16, 2020, over 2 million confirmed cases have occurred in 210 countries and territories, with 137,000 deaths. After the initial epicentre of Wuhan, Italy, Spain, France, the United Kingdom and the United States have been heavily affected with grave concerns held for the impending impact of COVID-19 in developing countries.

The nephrology community recognises their (mostly older) end stage kidney disease patient population are particularly vulnerable, as older people with chronic disease face increased risks of mortality and the necessity of regular hospital visits increases the risk of contracting the virus. In regions where vast numbers of cases have been recorded, health systems are strained to, and beyond, capacity.

The International Society of Nephrology and Kidney International, the ISN Journal, undertook a survey of nephrologists around the globe as represented by the ten ISN Regions, inquiring about the impact of COVID-19 on dialysis patients and staff and health system responses to the pandemic specific to dialysis.

COVID-19 poses an unprecedented threat to the modern world. Every region of the globe is affected, and dialysis services are particularly hit, with an unwell older population at increased risk of infection and mortality. Most haemodialysis patients are dialysed in centre and hence these patients are unable to self isolate, substantially increasing their risk of infection. Peritoneal dialysis patients may be less affected as they are better placed to practice social isolation.

The nephrology workforce is stretched, with an increased workload in both outpatient dialysis and inpatient consults for acute kidney injury secondary to COVID-19 infection. Healthcare workers are also falling ill or needing to be quarantined, further depleting the workforce at this time of increased need. Despite the significant psychological burden, centres around the world celebrate the resilience of their staff and their determination to care for their patients as best as possible.

Globally, mitigation strategies in dialysis units include:

  • Temperature checking and health screening of staff and patients prior to entering units
  • Cohorting (spatially and temporally) patients with suspected and proven COVID-19
  • Maintaining social distancing within units, where possible
  • PPE for staff when dealing with COVID-19+ or suspected patients
  • Differing rules about the wearing of face masks for asymptomatic in-centre dialysis patients
  • Educating patients on signs of COVID-19, social isolation and handwashing
  • The use of telehealth in place of physical reviews

Major challenges reported include:

  • Vastly increased workload with decreased staffing capacity
  • Lack of test kits
  • Lack of widespread testing, especially in outpatient facilities
  • Initial false negatives with earlier test kits
  • Lack of PPE
  • Difficulties in transporting patients to and from dialysis when there is a lockdown
  • Increased demand on dialysis services mean some centres have decreased number of sessions or number of hours per session for chronic haemodialysis patients

The rapidly evolving crisis of COVID-19 continues to imperil our vulnerable dialysis population. The ISN thanks all contributors for providing insights on current regional situations and responses the pandemic.

Senegal

Contributor: Prof. Abdou Niang

Hong Kong

Contributor: Professor Sydney Tang, Professor Philip Li

Hong Kong

Contributor: Dr. Angela Yee-Moon Wang, Dr. Lau Chak Sing Dr. Ivan Fan-Ngai Hung

India

Contributor: Prof.r Raja Ramachandran


Japan

Contributor: Prof. Masaomi Nangaku

Kazakhstan

Contributor: Dr. Abduzhappar Gaipov

Nepal

Contributor: Professor Dibya Singh Shah

Pakistan

Contributor: Professor Rubina Naqvi

Singapore

Contributor: Dr. Marjorie Foo

Dr. Marjorie Foo

South Korea

Contributor: Dr. Gheun-Ho Kim

Dr. Gheun-Ho Kim

Syria

Contributor: Dr. Bassam Saeed

Dr. Bassam Saeed

Denmark

Contributor: Prof. Bo Feldt-Rasmussen

France

Contributor: Prof. Eric Daugas

Italy

Contributor: Prof. Giuseppe Remuzzi

Spain

Contributor: Dr. María José Soler

Turkey

Contributor: Prof. Rumeyza Kazancioglu

United Kingdom

Contributor: Prof. Andrew Davenport

Canada

Contributor: Prof. Adeera Levin

United States of America

Contributor: Professor Steven Fishbane

USA
New York (Bronx)

Contributor: Professor Michael J. Ross

Australia

Contributor: Prof. Kevan Polkinghorne

Bolivia

Contributor: Dr. Rolando Claure-Del Granado

Brazil

Contributor: Dr. Augusto Cesar S Santos Jr

Subcategories

ISN Information
Article Count:
182
Jobs
Article Count:
14

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