Monday, 23 May 2016 12:33

SRC Program Level A : INDIA - UK

EC Institute: Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh India

EC Liaison officer: Vivek Jha

SC Institute: St Georges University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

SC Liaison officer: Debasish Banerjee 

 

Name of SRC Pair:  India-UK

SRC Level: Level A

 

India UK Level A pic1

Short description of the project:

The aim of the India-UK Sister Renal Centre project is to improve nephrology care for patients at the partner sites and in the region by education of nephrologists, working on service improvements and clinical research.

Learning objectives: 

  • Improve Nephrology Education through collaboration
  • Improve Nephrology care particularly vascular access and kidney transplantation
  • Establish research collaboration between the 2 centres

Education

  • Developemnt of vascular access service toolkit
  • Interactive online vascular access decision support system
  • Vascular access management protocols
  • Training videos
  • Essentials of advanced transplant immunology 
  • Diagnosing and managing antibody-mediated allograft injury
    Upgrade of clinical services
  • Assistance with setting up a vascular access intervention suite
  • Training of a vascular access nurse
  • Ongoing support to local access team
  • Setting up of transplant immunological risk assessment laboratory

Research

  • Expanding the ongoing collaboration on endothelial function in CKD
  • Enrolling PhD candidates
  • Opportunities for visits for learning specific research techniques
  • Establishing a survey to map the immunosuppression trend, practices and protocols in India
  • Developing the framework of a regional transplant registry
  • Mentorship and support with analysis and interpretation of complex data

Other Activities

  • Organising World Kidney day initiatives in 2016 with Pediatric nephrology
  • School education for kidney health awareness in children
  • Organizing screening programs for children in schools
  • Two focussed CMEs on vascular access and transplant immunosuppression
  • Presentation of results in meetings of Indian Society of Nephrology and WCN 2017

 

image caline silvaName: Viviane Calice da Silva

Hospital / Affiliation: Pro-Kidney Foundation, Joinville, Brazil and School of Medicine, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil

Home Country: Brazil

Host Country: USA, Malawi- Africa

Year: 2014

Status of your program: GRANT ACCEPTED

 

 

Title of the project: 

Salivary Urea As A Renal Function Marker In Acute Kidney Injury

Topic: 

Acute Kidney Injury

 

Short description of the project or abstract:

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is very common worldwide, causing high morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Currently, simple, inexpensive and fast tools to help in the diagnosis and guide treatment are lacking. Salivary urea nitrogen (SUN) dipstick has been proposed as a bedside, screening method to detect AKI. The aim of this project was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of SUN (compared to current standard methods), to diagnose and monitor patients suffering from AKI in different settings around the world. We measured SUN and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in hospitalized patients diagnosed with AKI based on AKIN and KDIGO-criteria. Patients evaluated in a cross sectional fashion (study 1) and were followed up for 7 days with daily (or every other day) (studies 2 and 3) blood and saliva measurements.
After collection, saliva was transferred to a colorimetric SUN dipstick (Integrated Biomedical Technology, IN). The resultant test-pad color was compared to six standardized color fields indicating SUN of 5–14, 15–24, 25–34, 35–54, 55–74, and ≥75 mg/dL, respectively. BUN was determined by the urease method. AKI was stratified according to the AKIN or KDIGO classification. The diagnostic performance and agreement to severity of AKI were studied in all 3 population across studies using a standardized statistical approach: Bland-Altman analysis and linear mixed effects models to test agreement between SUN and BUN and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) statistics were used to test the diagnostic performance to diagnose AKI severity.

Two hundred fourteen patients were enrolled in the 3 studies, 44 in the cross-sectional analysis and 170 in the follow up study (40 Brazil + USA and 130 Malawi, Africa). SUN and BUN had a good agreement (Spearman rank Rs = 0.69; p<0.001). Diagnostic performance of SUN to diagnose AKI stage 3 was: AUC ROC 0.90 (95% CI 0.80-1.0) (Study 1) and AUC 0.81 (95% CI 0.63 to 0.98) (Study 2) and to diagnose AKI all stages AUC 0.82 (95% CI 0.78–0.87) (Study 3). These results were comparable to the BUN findings: AUC ROC 0.90 (95% CI 0.77-1.0) (Study 1), AUC 0.85 (95% CI 0.71 to 0.98) (Study 2) and AUC 0.82 (95% CI 0.59–1.0)(Study 3). BUN is underestimated by SUN consistently across studies, populations and days in the follow up, and discriminated with comparable accuracy. 

According to the results presented in summary here, SUN has an equivalent diagnostic performance compared to BUN to detect AKI, particularly in the most severe presentations. Even though SUN underestimates BUN, SUN reliably reflects BUN and follows its changes over time. Therefore, SUN testing associated with a thorough clinical evaluation may assist in the identification of patients with suspected AKI, especially under circumstances of limited health care resources and in the most remote settings. The next steps are to analyze the data collected in Angola regarding AKI in patients suffering from Malaria and also start the project application in children with AKI which is intend to start in the second semester of 2016.

 

Learning or Research objectives:

The aim of this project is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of SUN (compared to current standard methods), to diagnose and monitor patients suffering from AKI in different settings around the world, especially under circumstances of limited health care resources.

 

image okunolaName: OLUYOMI OKUNOLA

Hospital / Affiliation: Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, ILE-IFE.

Home Country: NIGERIA

Host Country: NIGERIA

Year: 2012

Status of your program: COMPLETED

 

 

Title of the project: 

Limiting progression to end stage kidney failure with sodium bicarbonate therapy :
A preliminary report from a developing country

Topic: 

Chronic Kidney disease

 

Short description of the project or abstract:

The incidence of CKD in adult Nigerians has risen from 10 to 18.8%. 
In Nigeria, end stage renal disease is a serious public health challenge. The access to renal replacement therapy is limited and mortality rates are very high, up to 100% in most cases because less than 5% of the patients can afford the cost of haemodialysis for more than 3 months. In recent studies, administration of alkali have also been found to reduce muscle degradation, improve albumin synthesis and reducing the progression of bone diseases. The burden of renal replacement therapy in sub Saharan Africa is quite enormous, the infrastructures are grossly inadequate and the cost is barely affordable for a large majority of people with end stage kidney failure in a developing economy. It is envisaged that with the wide use of less cost intensive therapy such as sodium bicarbonate treatment most especially as an adjunct therapy to standard treatment in developing countries, progression to ESKD (end-stage kidney disease) would be reduced in a majority of our pre-dialytic patients. Using block randomization method, a total number of 63 adults above the age of 18 years in stage 4 CKD with established metabolic acidosis i.e serum bicarbonate between 16mmol/l and 20 mmol/l measured on two consecutive occasions and in stable clinical condition were recruited for the study after an informed consent.

The study was conducted over a 24-month period. There was a moderate increase in the mean creatinine clearance in the subjects arm. There was a noticeable rise in the bicarbonate serum in the subjects.
From a mean value of 20.5mmol/l at the beginning of the study to 22.3mmol/l at the end amongst the subjects as compared with 20.8mmol/l at commencement and 20.5mmol/l amongst the controls after 24 months.
Protein excretion levels using the 24 hour protein estimation was slightly increased among both the subjects and the controls from 1.25g/24hours at baseline to 1.47g/24 hours for the former and from 0.90g to 1.14g/24hours amongst the controls at the end of the study .
The serum albumin level was used as a surrogate of nutritional level and there was a noticeable increase from a mean value of 33g/dl at baseline to 35.1g/dl for the subjects at the end of the study. (p value of 0.047).
There was no effect on the mean haemoglobin levels in both subject and the controls as both groups had comparatively similar levels of 8g/dl and 7.5g/dl at the onset and 6.5g/dl and 6g/dl respectively.

14 patients out of 31 controls progressed to end stage kidney failure while 5 out of 32 in the subjects group had progressed to end stage. (95% confidence interval of -1.90 to 1.22). Only 1 patient amongst the subjects reported of a transient episode of severe bloating. No other adverse drug reaction (to bicarbonate) was reported at each follow up.

 

Learning or Research objectives:

  • beneficiate the effects of sodium bicarbonate therapy in pre dialytic CKD patient,
  • determine the role of sodium bicarbonate therapy in improving the nutritional parameters of patients in stage4
  • determine the capacity of sodium bicarbonate therapy in retarding progression to ESRD and, (iv)to determine the effects between sodium bicarbonate treatment on biochemical parameters such as albumin and calcium, phosphates

 

image sethiName: Sidharth Kumar Sethi

Hospital / Affiliation: MEDANTA, THE MEDICITY

Home Country: INDIA

Host Country: INDIA

Year: 2016

Status of your program: GRANT ACCEPTED

 

 

Title of the project: 

Study on the long term renal outcome of pediatric patients admitted in pediatric intensive care unit and post cardiac surgery

Topics: 

Chronic Kidney Injury, Acute Kidney Injury, Pediatric Nephrology

 

Short description of the project or abstract:

The epidemiology of pediatric acute kidney injury (pAKI) has transformed in the last decades with a shift from primary kidney disease to AKI associated with systemic illnesses or their treatments in critically-ill children and neonates. Even though pAKI has been shown to be associated with poor short-term outcomes including mortality in multiple studies, the long-term renal outcomes in survivors of pAKI in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU/NICU) setting have been understudied and we could only find limited observational studies from PICU revealing a high prevalence of chronic renal abnormalities or chronic kidney disease (CKD) following AKI (PICU:10-69%).

Thus the purpose of this study is to explore the burden of adverse renal outcome in children aged 0-18 years after an episode of AKI in pediatric intensive care or pediatric cardiothoracic intensive care.
Study Design : Cross-Sectional Pilot
Study Duration: 1 year (Patients shall be enrolled and assessed over a period of 1 year)
Study population : All pediatric patients (aged 0-18 years) who were admitted in pediatric intensive care (PICU) or, those who underwent a cardiopulmonary bypass in the year 2012- 2014, and had AKI will be followed up.

 

Learning or Research objectives:

To find out the adverse renal outcome in pediatric patients aged 0-18 years following AKI in terms of:

  • Reduced GFR< 90 mL/min/1.73 m2
  • Hypertension
  • Proteinuria, including tubular proteinuria Significance

There are large number of patients with sequel following AKI, and since early CKD is clinically silent, with proteinuria and hypertension being two treatable complications of kidney disease, children should undergo regular urine analysis and blood pressure assessments at least annually for several years after their AKI.

 

image leivaName: Ricardo Leiva  coworkers : Marvin Gonzalez, Channa Jayasumana, Annika Wernerson

Hospital / Affiliation: Cordinating institution: Hospital Nacional Rosales, San Salvador, El Salvador

Home Country: El Salvador

Year: 2013

Status of your program: IN PROGRESS

 

 

 

Title of the project: 

Chronic Kidney Disease of unknown origin (CKDu) :Is it the same disease in Central America and in Asia?
A comparison of renal histopathology - and biochemical findings in patients with CKDu 

Topics:

Chronic kidney Disease, Pathology

 

Short description of the project or abstract:

During the last decades, several rural regions in Central America have seen a dramatic increase of a chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology, unexplained by conventional risk factors like diabetes and hypertension (CKDu). El Salvador and Nicaragua have the highest death rates due to kidney disease worldwide according to WHO. CKDu often affects young and middle-aged male laborers in the agricultural sector, in particular sugarcane workers. The leading hypothesis is that occupational heat stress with repeated dehydration/volume depletion causes the kidney damage.
However, this hypothesis has not yet been definitely proven. An increased prevalence of CKDu has also been reported from the rural North Central province of Sri Lanka, where the disease often affects agricultural workers engaged in rice cultivation. There are also limited reports from rural regions in India. The distinct geographical and socioeconomic disease patterns suggest that environmental and occupational factors may have an important role as causative agents.

The increase in CKDu in certain regions in Central America and Sri Lanka is overwhelming the healthcare systems and also has a profound negative effect on vulnerable poor rural communities. It is of great importance to understand the disease and its mechanisms in order to develop primary and secondary prevention programs. To study the renal morphology in kidney biopsies gives important knowledge about possible pathophysiological mechanisms. Biopsy studies from El Salvador report a unique renal morphology with damage to both glomerular and interstitial compartments. Studies from Sri Lanka report a tubulointerstitial disease with glomerular damage. However, a direct comparison of the biopsy studies is not possible due to differences in included participants. Thus, as of yet, it is not established that the CKDu in Central America and Sri Lanka are similar diseases.

The general aim of this study is to explore whether the CKDu observed in Central America and Asia are similar diseases – an important step into elucidation of the etiology(ies).
This will be accomplished by meetings, assembly of well-characterized biopsies from cohorts of CKDu patients from El Salvador, Nicaragua and Sri Lanka, and a workshop at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, for pathologists from each participating country where biopsies are scrutinized, followed by collaborative scientific evaluation.

Progress: As of today the cohorts from El Salvador and Nicaragua has been described in detail and the study of CKDu patients from Sri Lanka will take place in May 2016. Collaborating researchers and nephrologists has been identified in India. When the Sri Lanka biopsy study has been performed and analysed, planning for the joint workshop on the renal morphology will start.

 

Learning or Research objectives:

  • To compare the renal morphology and biochemical findings in well characterized cohorts of patients from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Sri Lanka, and possibly also other countries with CKDu
  • To develop and implement a scheme for histopathological changes and diagnostic criteria, that can be used for both clinical documentation and future collaborative studies
  • To create a network of pathologists with a special interest in renal pathology to strengthen the local capacity in each participating center

 

image KamathName: Nivedita Kamath

Hospital / Affiliation: St. John's Medical College Hospital, Bangalore

Home Country: India

Host Country: India 

Year: 2013

Status of your program: IN PROGRESS

 

 

Title of the project: 

Chronic Kidney Disease: Assessment of progression, co-morbidities and quality of life in Indian children

Topics: 

Chronic Kidney Disease, Pediatric Nephrology 

 

Short description of the project or abstract:

Chronic kidney disease in children in developing countries is often diagnosed late and children are referred in late stages with severe co-morbidities. The chronic disease not only impacts the quality of life of the affected child but also the family. There is no prospective data from developing countries regarding the risk factors associated with progression, the associated co-morbidities and the quality of life in children with chronic kidney disease.
This is a prospective study conducted over for a period of two years in the Department of Pediatric Nephrology, St. John’s Medical College, Bangalore. The baseline demographic characteristics and treatment details of the cohort was recorded. The modifiable risk factors like proteinuria, blood pressure and other co-morbidities like anemia, mineral bone disease and cardiovascular disease were noted. The quality of life was assessed in these children using the PedsQL questionnaire.

Seventy four children were recruited into the study. Renal hypodysplasia/aplasia accounted for the majority of kidney diseases resulting in chronic kidney disease. Twenty percent of children with chronic kidney disease progressed to ESRD in one year with a median rate of decline in GFR being 3.3 ml/min/1.73m2 per year. The severity of proteinuria at baseline is a significant modifiable risk factor whereas, etiology of CKD and baseline GFR were important non modifiable risk factors for progression. Hypertension was prevalent in 62% of our cohort but did not influence progression of disease.
Anemia was prevalent in a third of our cohort and low haemoglobin levels were significantly associated with lower GFR. Vitamin D deficiency was universal in our cohort and showed significant improvement with treatment. Hyperparathyroidism which correlated with vitamin D levels at recruitment, significantly improved with correction of vitamin D deficiency.
Hyperlipidemia was seen in two thirds of our patients. Almost half of our cohort had left ventricular hypertrophy. Anemia and hyperparathyroidism were significantly associated with left ventricular hypertrophy. The left ventricular mass index did not correlate significantly with the GFR or with blood pressure. Structural change in the carotid intimal thickness was high in our cohort and was significantly associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure.
The parent’s proxy physical and psychosocial scores were significantly influenced by lower levels of GFR, lower height z scores and lower socioeconomic status. The psychosocial scores of both the parent and the child were significantly lower in families belonging to the lower socioeconomic group.

Conclusions:
The median rate of progression in our cohort was 3.3ml/min/1.73m2 per year. Glomerular disease, proteinuria and lower baseline GFR were significant risk factors for progression. Anemia and iron deficiency were prevalent in one third of the population. Vitamin D deficiency was universal in our cohort and was a significant contributor to hyperparathyroidism. Left ventricular hypertrophy was seen in half of the cohort and anemia was a significant risk factor for left ventricular hypertrophy. Lower socioeconomic status, lower height z scores and lower levels of GFR were associated with lower quality of life scores.

 

Learning or Research objectives:

  •  To study the rate of progression of stages II to IV CKD and identify modifiable and non- modifiable risk factors for progression of CKD in children
  • To assess the severity of co-morbidities like anemia, mineral bone disease and cardiovascular disease in these children
  • To study the impact of disease on Quality of life of children with stages II to IV CKD

 

image juneName: June Fabian

Hospital / Affiliation: Wits Donald Gordon Medical Centre/ University of the Witwatersrand

Home Country: South Africa

Host Country: n/a

Year: 2016

Status of your program: IN PROGRESS

 

 

Title of the project: 

Validation of eGFR formulae and Point-of-Care Creatinine measurements in the Assessment of kidney function in Africans

Topic: 

Chonic Kidney Disease

 

Short description of the project or abstract: 

This project aims to investigate currently available methods to assess kidney function in Africans. Early detection of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is based on simple routine laboratory tests such as urine protein and serum creatinine. A recent meta-analysis of data from several African countries showed the overall prevalence of CKD was 13.9%[1]. They noted an absence of validated and reliable measures of kidney function for Africans in Africa and noted that the prevalence estimates varied substantially even within similar populations depending on the definition of CKD used and the method of measurement.
Serum creatinine levels have been shown to be higher in African Americans regardless of kidney function. In response to this, adjustments for ethnicity have been included in the 4-variable MDRD and the CKD-EPI equations. Data from our centre has shown that these equations perform better without the adjustment for ethnicity. This has also been demonstrated in studies from Kwa-Zulu Natal and Western Cape, South Africa. Studies from Kenya and Ghana also showed an over-estimation of the GFR with the adjustment for ethnicity. In all of these sub-Saharan African studies, the BMI and weight of all participants was lower than in studies from Europe and the USA, suggesting that lower muscle mass may contribute to this phenomenon. However, the single limiting factor, for all these studies has been in the small sample size.

To date, there have been no population-based studies that have validated the use of eGFR equations in South Africans. In this study we will determine how best to measure kidney function accurately using serum creatinine and cystatin C (cysC). We will do this by comparing the accuracy of different equations for calculating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to a directly measured GFR using iohexol (iGFR). We will use an appropriately large sample size that will allow the derivation of a new equation that accurately predicts kidney function in black Africans. This will be determinant to future diagnosis and management of patients with CKD in South Africa as well as for the conduct of future epidemiological studies. We will also assess the accuracy and precision of a point of care device for determination of estimated GFR. This is essential to determine whether existing devices are sufficiently accurate for assessing kidney function in resource-limited areas.

 

Learning or Research objectives:

  • To evaluate the accuracy and precision of the MDRD and the CKD-EPI with and without the inclusion of the ethnicity factor to iGFR
  • To compare the accuracy and the precision of the CKD-EPI cysC and combined cysC, creatinine equation to iGFR
  • To develop a new equation for use in black Africans that may include the use of other variables such as height
  • To assess the accuracy of a point of care device(POC) for the estimation of GFR

 

image dreyerName: Dr Gavin Dreyer

Hospital / Affiliation: Royal Free Hospital London, UK and Malawi College of Medicine, Blantyre Malawi

Home Country: UK

Host Country: Malawi

Year: 2013

Status of your program: COMPLETED

 

 

Title of the program: 

A population based screening and prevention programme for CKD and associated non-communicable diseases in Blantyre, Malawi

Topic: 

Chronic Kidney Disease 

 

Short description of the project or abstract:

The Global Burden of Disease initiative reports that in 2000 there were approximately 55,000 cases of diabetes mellitus in Malawi predicted to rise to 118,000 by 2030. Additionally, Malawi is thought to have an almost three-fold higher cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rate than both the United Kingdom and the United States.
However, there is a paucity of data about the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Malawi at a time when NCDs known to cause CKD are increasing. This is critically relevant because the Malawian government is currently expanding haemodialysis services nationwide to meet the growing but as yet unquantified burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Currently, no services to screen for the early stages of kidney disease exist in Malawi. The yearly, per patient cost of haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis in Malawi are $26,000 and $65,000 respectively but these figures exclude staff costs and additional consumable supplies beyond those essential for the technical process of blood purification.
The huge economic cost of dialysis in Malawi means that very few people can benefit from it and the lack of transplantation means that dialysis is a little more than palliative care in this setting. Crucial to the economic viability and sustainability of therapies for ESRD in a resource limited setting such as Malawi, is a comprehensive and accurate understanding of the earlier stages of kidney disease and its causative factors where low cost, high impact interventions offer a more economically viable, long term solution to kidney disease than renal replacement therapies. This study is designed to evaluate the prevalence and possible risk factors for CKD in a community dwelling adult population in Malawi.

 

Learning or Research objectives:

  • To measure the prevalence and distribution of CKD and associated NCDs and their risk factors within the study population
  • To provide aetiological insights into the variation in cardio-metabolic risk factors in adults
  • To improve government awareness, inform health policy and strategic planning for public health programmes aimed at addressing the rise in NCDs in Malawi, which may also shape public health strategies in other African countries
  • To create a unique framework for building a large scale prospective cohort study in an African population to examine a wide range of health indices - and lay the groundwork for additional long-term studies

 

image bravoName: Katia Marisa Bravo-Jaimes, M.D.

Hospital / Affiliation: Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia / Research Associate University of Rochester Medical Center / Internal Medicine Resident

Home Country: Peru

Host Country: Peru

Year: 2011

Status of your program: IN PROGRESS

 

 

Title of the project: 

Effect of altitude on mortality of end-stage kidney disease patients ongoing hemodialysis in Peru

Topic: 

Chonic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis 

 

Short description of the project or abstract:

BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease is a public health problem around the world. In Latin America, the prevalence of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients has tremendously risen during the last decade. Previous studies have suggested that receiving dialysis at high altitude confers mortality benefits; however this effect has not been proved above 2000 meters or in developing countries.

METHODS: This historical cohort study analized medical records from six hemodialysis centers of the Peruvian Social Security System. The selected centers were located at 44, 150, 1894, 2335, 3400 and 3827 meters above the sea level (masl). Adult ESKD patients who started hemodialysis between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010 were included. Patients were classifed into two strata based on the elevation above the sea level of their city of residence: < 2000 masl and > 2000 masl. Demographic characteristics and cause of ESKD were recorded at first hemodialysis. The outcome variable was death from any cause, which was collected from national registries. Cox proportional hazards models were built for the time from first dialysis to death from any cause, stratifying by year and censoring patients by December 31, 2013; at 5 years after first dialysis; loss to follow-up; transference to another hemodialysis center out of the city; renal transplantation or migration to peritoneal dialysis during follow-up. Those who lived at 44 and 150 masl served as the reference category for all statistical analysis. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: 723 patients were enrolled. Women represented 38.2% of the sample (n=248). The mean age was 52.8 ±16.9 years. The group of > 2000 masl was composed of 166 patients (22%). The 5-year all-cause mortality rate was 81 per 1000 person-years. There was a dual but not significant effect in survival according to altitude. In first years after follow-up, survival rates were lower in the group > 2000 masl, however after 8 years of follow-up this trend reversed (p=0.091). Age at first hemodialysis and gender were not significantly associated to mortality at altitude levels > 2000 masl. Only patients with diabetes as cause of ESKD had higher mortality rates at > 2000 masl [HR 2.7 (CI 95% 1.4-5.3), p=0.003]. This association was independent of age at first hemodialysis.

CONCLUSIONS: In Peru, patients receiving hemodialysis at high altitude do not experience mortality benefits. In fact, diabetics experience higher mortality rates at > 2000 masl.

 

Learning or Research objectives:

To determine the effect of altitude on mortality of end-stage renal disease patients receiving hemodialysis in Peru.

 

image hai anName: Ha Phan Hai An

Hospital / Affiliation: Viet Duc hospital

Home Country: Vietnam

Host Country: Vietnam

Year: 2010

Status of your program: COMPLETED

 

 

Title of the project: 

Detection of Chronic Kidney Disease and some risk factors among adult inhabitants
in mountainous Northern part of Vietnam: A pilot study

Topic: 

Chronic Kidney Disease 

 

Short description of the project or abstract:

In Vietnam the patients with End-Stage-Kidney-Diseases are diagnosed late when the cost for replaccement treatment is hardly afordable, thus many patients are left untreated. Early detection of disease and appropriate management at early stage seem to be raisonable approach for Vietnamese people.
Unfortunately the screening policy is still not implemented due to limited budget. The data of prevalence of CKD and risk factors can be of great help in policy making and thus adjusting the budget. The project aims to learn about the prevalence of CKD (using physical examination, labsticks for urinalysis, blood urea and creatinin, blood sugar) and its risk factors (using questionnaire and focusing on history of Hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes melitus, cardiovascular disease, smoking, alcohol asumption, family history…) among adults living in mountainous area of North Vietnam

 

Learning or Research objectives:

  • Prevalence of CKD in studied population
  • Risk factors observed among studied population

 

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