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Luca Segantini

Luca Segantini

Hi, as ISN Executive Director I am here to ensure that all ISN trains come to the station on time and that passengers are satisfied. Please do get in touch on lsegantini@theisn.org to comment, share or simply to talk.

Sunday, 12 November 2017 17:20

Sister center partners meet in Guatemala

The Washington University (WU) School of Medicine in St-Louis recently took part in the First Annual Update in Nephrology: Leading the Battle against Chronic Kidney Disease in Guatemala City.

This ISN Sister Renal Center partnership, including researchers, residents, fellows and staff from WU and the IGSS hospital system and Roosevelt Hospital in Guatemala City, has been working to study MesoAmerican Nephropathy.

Read more HERE. This article is provided courtesy of the Washington University (WU) School of Medicine in St-Louis.

Professor Robin Anthony Jeffrey Eady MBE, was a British dermatologist and the world's longest surviving kidney patient after receiving dialysis from the 1960s.

It was recently reported on Ghana web news that First Sky Group of Companies has donated two million Ghana Cedis to Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, so more patients with acute kidney disease can get free treatment across the country.

According to the recent Google Scholar metrics, Kidney International is ranked first among all nephrology journals.

Google Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Scholar Metrics summarize recent citations to many publications, to help authors as they consider where to publish their new research.

Screenshot 2017 07 24 14.13.47

Adeera Levin interviewed by Cameroon TV news during the AFRAN 2017 congress in Yaounde (15-19 March 2017). She talks about the multiple programs of ISN in Africa, and about the long-standing collaboration between ISN and AFRAN, which is essential for the progress of kidney care in the Continent.

The AFRAN 2017 congress saw a sizable ISN representation, with, beyond our President, David Harris (President Elect), John Feehally (Programs Chair), Fred Finkelstein (Dialysis and CME Chair), Simon Davies (Dialysis Chair), Mohammed Ben Gharbi (Africa Regional Board Chair), Luca Segantini (ISN Executive Director) and many others.

Please watch the video from CrTV:

 

On February 7 and 8, 2017, ISN participated to the Summit of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism in Vatican City. ISN fully endorsed the Summit’s Statement, which calls on all religious, political and social leaders, national and international legislators to recognize that organ and human trafficking for organ removal are ‘true crimes against humanity.’

dialysisA dialysis patient referred me to this article from The Atlantic. Published in 2010 but still worth reading. The ISN is all about closing gaps in the provision of kidney care worldwide, but when we think of "gaps", we tend to think of emerging countries, places in Africa or the poorest parts of Asia and Latin America. However, as the article recounts, there are significant gaps in the provision of dialysis even in the United States. Please do read this excellent story, which includes words from ISN past president, dr. Giuseppe Remuzzi, among others.

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2010/12/-god-help-you-youre-on-dialysis/308308/

Friday, 08 April 2016 11:37

KI Reports now accepting submissions

KI reportsKidney International Reports, an official journal of the International Society of Nephrology, is a peer-reviewed, open access journal devoted to the publication of leading research and developments related to kidney disease.

Access to diagnosis and dialysis for acute kidney injury can be life-saving, but can be prohibitively expensive in low-income settings. The burden of acute kidney injury in sub-Saharan Africa is presumably high but remains unknown. The authors of this study did a systematic review to assess outcomes of acute kidney injury in sub-Saharan Africa and identify barriers to care.

Rates of Chronic Kidney Disease vary considerably across Europe, from 3% to 17% of the population, and are increasing. Demand for kidneys almost always exceeds possible supply, and each country manages transplants differently. A new survey, being presented at the European Association of Urology (EAU) congress in Munich, has shown significant differences in the number of donor kidneys available in each country.

Comparing data from a range of registers, the EAU research found wide country to country variation. For example:

Russian Federation 3.3
Greece 4.2
Germany 10.4
Switzerland 14.3
Poland 15.5
The Netherlands 16.8
UK 20.6
Italy 22.7
France 25.3
Portugal 27.3
Croatia 35.1
Spain 35.7

All figures are 2014 figures. All figures are deceased donors per million population.

Although each country is very different, thse variations mainly depend on two factors, social attitude and perception of organ donation, and legislation. Most organs for transplantation come from brain-dead donors. In Spain for example, each citizen is a potential donor unless they 'opt-out' of the transplant scheme, whereas in Germany there is an 'opt-in' scheme. Some countries also allow donation from living donors, or from persons whose hearts have stopped. The number of organs from both these sources has been increasing.

As transplants becomes more mainstream, and rates of kidney failure are increasing, the demand for organs has increased quite significantly, and there is a general need for more organs to be available. At the moment, whether you can find a donor organ largely depends on where you live. If countries want to increase transplant rates, and so increase survival from kidney failure, they might consider changing the way they source donor organs.

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