Milestones in Nephrology

ISN is pleased to announce a monthly series, “Milestones in Nephrology”, from the editorial team of Kidney International (KI). Through the course of 2020, this series will highlight 60 historical papers of importance to the nephrology community from the early days of KI.

Every month in 2020, five groundbreaking KI papers will be republished, discussed by an editor, and put into perspective of the most recent advances in the field.

This series sets the scene for the upcoming year of celebratory activities planned in 2020 to commemorate ISN’s 60th anniversary and the achievements ISN has made through its members and supporters.

To celebrate ISN’s 60th anniversary throughout 2020, Kidney International’s “Milestones in Nephrology” series launches with a review of the development in understanding of the pathophysiology of the glomerulus, highlighting several original articles published in KI:

  • The glomerular signature in patients with hematuria (Kenneth F. Fairley and Douglas F. Birch, 1982);
  • The permselectivity of the glomerular capillary wall (Ramsay L.S. Chang, William M. Deen, Channing R. Robertson, and Barry M. Brenner, 1975);
  • T-cells and macrophages in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis: clinicopathologic correlations (Bolton W.K., Innes D.J. Jr., Sturgill B.C., Kaiser D.L., 1987);
  • Glomerular hemodynamic changes vs. hypertrophy in experimental glomerular sclerosis(Yoshida Y., Fogo A., Ichikawa I., 1989); and
  • Genetic studies into inherited and sporadic hemolytic uremic syndrome(Warwicker P., Goodship T.H.J., Donne R.L., et al., 1998).

These articles, despite sometimes triggering controversy, opened the way for improved patient care, innovative therapeutic intervention, and genetic screening.

These groundbreaking papers from KI, shared monthly, will be discussed by an editor from KI and put into perspective of the most recent advances in the field.

To celebrate ISN’s 60th anniversary, Kidney International’s Milestones in Nephrology” series continues with a review of five foundational contributions related to various tubular segments in the normal and diseased kidney:

  • Model for bicarbonate and fluid reabsorption in the proximal tubule (McKinney TD, Burg MB., 1977)
  • Intralysosomal digestion of endocytosed proteins in proximal tubule cells (Christensen EI, Maunsbach AB., 1974)
  • The countercurrent multiplication system in the medulla (Kokko JP, Rector FC Jr., 1972)
  • Treatment of Bartter syndrome with indomethacin (Verberckmoes R, van Damme BB, Clement J, et al., 1976)
  • Plasticity in the distal nephron following acid-base modifications (Hagége J, Gabe M, Richet G., 1974)

Celebrating ISN’s 60th anniversary, Kidney International’s “Milestones in Nephrology” series continues with a review of some of the original articles it has published on the treatment of glomerular disease, publications that helped make significant changes in patient management:

  • Shorter term corticosteroids are equally effective as longer term in primary nephrotic syndrome in children (Yoshikawa N, Nakanishi K, Sako M, et al.)
  • Calcineurin inhibitors in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and membranous nephropathy (Cattran DC, Appel GB, Hebert LA, et al.)
  • High-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation is feasible in end-stage kidney failure patients with amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis (Casserly LF, Fadia A, Sanchorawala V, et al.)
  • Renal effects of enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease (FD) (Thurberg BL, Rennke H, Colvin RB, et al.)

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To celebrate ISNs 60th anniversary, Kidney International’s “Milestones in Nephrology” series continues with Agnes B. Fogo’s review of some of the original articles KI has published on renal morphology:

  • Nephrin’s role in the podocyte (Holzman LB, St. John PL, Kovari IA, et al., 1999);
  • Plasticity of podocytes (Bariéty J, Nochy D, Mandet C, et al.,1998);
  • Podocyte loss linked to glomerulosclerosis (Kim YH, Goyal M, Kurnit D, et al.,2001);
  • Novel entity linked to monoclonal protein deposition (Nasr SH, Markowitz GS, Stokes MB, et al., 2004); and
  • IgA nephropathy morphologic risk factors defined (Roberts ISD, Cook HT, Troyanov S, et al., 2009; Cattran DC, Coppo R, Cook HT, et al., 2009).

To celebrate ISN’s 60th anniversary, Kidney International’s Milestones in Nephrology” series continues with a review of five foundational contributions related to various tubular segments in the normal and diseased kidney:

  • Model for bicarbonate and fluid reabsorption in the proximal tubule (McKinney TD, Burg MB., 1977)
  • Intralysosomal digestion of endocytosed proteins in proximal tubule cells (Christensen EI, Maunsbach AB., 1974)
  • The countercurrent multiplication system in the medulla (Kokko JP, Rector FC Jr., 1972)
  • Treatment of Bartter syndrome with indomethacin (Verberckmoes R, van Damme BB, Clement J, et al., 1976)
  • Plasticity in the distal nephron following acid-base modifications (Hagége J, Gabe M, Richet G., 1974)

As part of ISN’s 60th-anniversary, Kidney International’s “Milestones in Nephrology” series highlights five key contributions to the multidisciplinary field of kidney stone disease:

  • Estimating the burden of kidney stone disease (Johnson CM, Wilson DM, O’Fallon WM, et al., 1979)
  • Urine chemistry as a window into kidney stone risk (Curhan GC, Willett WC, Speizer FE, Stampfer MJ., 2001)
  • Identifying risk factors for hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate stones (Holmes RP, Goodman HO, Assimos DG., 2007)
  • Linking the metabolic syndrome to kidney stone risk: epidemiology and mechanisms (Abate N, Chandalia M, Cabo-Chan AV Jr., et al. 2005)
  • Beyond stones: implicating hyperuricemia in hypertension and kidney disease (Sanchez-Lozada LG, Tapia E, Santamaria J, et al., 2005)

As part of ISN’s 60th-anniversary, Kidney International’s Milestones in Nephrology” series highlights five significant contributions to the understanding of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis:

  • A mechanistic analysis of the National Cooperative Dialysis Study (NCDS) (Gotch FA, Sargent JA, 1985)
  • Computer simulations of peritoneal fluid transport in CAPD (Rippe B, Stelin G, Haraldsson B, 1991)
  • Nitrogen balance during intermittent dialysis therapy of uremia (Borah MF, Schoenfeld PY, Gotch FA, et al., 1978)
  • Biocompatibility of dialysis membranes: effects of chronic complement activation (Hakim RM, Fearon DT, Lazarus JM, 1984)
  • Outcome of patients with human immunodeficiency virus on maintenance hemodialysis (Ortiz C, Meneses R, Jaffe D, et al., 1988)

As part of ISN’s 60th-anniversary, Kidney International’s Milestones in Nephrology” series highlights five significant contributions toacute kidney injury, diabetic kidney disease, and cell biology:

  • Glomerular hemodynamics in experimental diabetes mellitus(Hostetter TH, Troy JL, Brenner BM, 1981)
  • Effect of intensive therapy on the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial(The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) Research Group, 1995)
  • Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1): a novel biomarker for human renal proximal tubule injury(Han WK, Bailly V, Abichandani R, et al. 2002)
  •  HK-2: an immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell line from normal adult human kidney(Ryan MJ, Johnson G, Kirk J, et al. 1994)
  • Identification of the renal erythropoietin-producing cells using transgenic mice(Maxwell PH, Osmond MK, Pugh CW, et al. 1993)

As part of ISN’s 60th-anniversary, Kidney International’s Milestones in Nephrology” series highlights five significant contributions to cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease:

Ischemic heart disease in patients on hemodialysis therapy (Rostand SG, Gretes JC, Kirk KA, et al., 1979)

Uremia-associated increase in myocardial interstitial fibrosis (Mall G, Rambausek M, Neumeister A, et al., 1988)

Aortic pulse wave velocity index and mortality in end-stage renal disease (Blacher J, Safar ME, Guerin AP, et al., 2003)

Effect of anemia correction on established LVH in patients undergoing hemodialysis therapy (Foley RN, Parfrey PS, Morgan J, et al., 2000)

Sevelamer attenuates the progression of coronary and aortic calcification in hemodialysis patients (Chertow GM, Burke SK, Raggi P, et al., 2002)